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I'm glad that he went from any excuse to go traveling to being responsible. It's a shame I couldn't bring myself to finish this and his journey. I got so bogged down in reading about his life, and experiences that I was exhausted by the time I get to the worker's experience. I found myself asking, "What is the point of this? What I give up on this one. What was the point of this book? Wasn't it to enlighten the reader about the people who create our garments and put a face to those sweatshop workers? I thought that was the point, but I think I was wrong.

Apparently this book is about his experience, backgrounds of the countries, about 10 pages on the workers themselves, and whatever update he felt like pursuing. I get that I need some information to set the scene, but it felt like that was all I was reading. Maybe if I had kept reading I would have a different opinion of the overall tone of the book and the approach. But I couldn't, so my view remains unchanged. What about the dreaded child labor?

I think that in addition to his Sociology , he should have taken Labor History Never fear, I have taken such a class. If he had as well, he would have then known that we too, went through such debates in our workforce. That many mainly southern families depended on kids leaving school at the age of 8 or 10 and working. Our economy did not collapse because of them, or even minimum wage laws. But this next part is key. We, as Americans decided what to do with our child labor, not England the leading industrialized nation and a leading global garment producer at the time , or any other country.

We decided to use that opportunity to invest in our children's future, and therefore the betterment of our country. Funny fact, education was pushed not for some moral benefit of the poor being people too, but that schooling produced better and happier workers. Countries like Bangladesh have to make those choices for themselves. If they have something like child labor legislation forced upon them and they do not subsequently take that opportunity to invest in themselves, then we have essentially sentenced them to starve.

I had hoped for more. I read almost half of the book and felt like I sort of "met" one person in his silly adventure. I feel it should also be noted that I did not feel that it was silly until I reflected upon what I had read. All I got so far was a young man who needed another excuse to go traveling. I thought college kids that worked until they had enough money to go travel for a few months then work again, were the stuff of myths and legends.

Instead of meeting garment workers and learning their stories, I met one of these mythical creatures and his name is Kelsey Timmerman. Dec 27, Jared rated it really liked it Shelves: common-reading-options , authors-i-have-met , common-reading-program-finalists. I really like the premise of the book and enjoyed Timmerman's approach to bringing to life the challenges of consuming in a global marketplace. He made me really pause and think about the way I consume.

But, ultimately I'm not sure I have the will power, energy, or faith that changing my buying habits will change the lives of the front-line factory workers around the world. I guess I don't trust big businesses and their ability to pass the increased revenues earned from increased product costs d I really like the premise of the book and enjoyed Timmerman's approach to bringing to life the challenges of consuming in a global marketplace.

I guess I don't trust big businesses and their ability to pass the increased revenues earned from increased product costs down to the factory workers who deserve the raise. Even if we pay more for a product doesn't mean they will pay their workers more. As much as I think about it, I can't wrap my mind around any solutions.

And, I get frustrated that the authors rarely attempt to articulate solutions. I just wish we could live in a world where there was more equality and fairness As I pause and think about this book, the one point that really stands out to me is how lucky I was to be born where I was, into the family I have, and to live the life that I lead. I thought this quote on pg. Nobel Prize-winning economist and social scientist Herbert Simon estimated that "social capital" a functioning government, access to technology, abundant natural resources is responsible for at least 90 percent of what people earn in wealthy societies like the United States.

Warren Buffett said, "If you stick me down in the middle of Bangladesh or Peru, you'll find out how much this talent is going to produce in the wrong kind of soil. Mar 09, Kari Shepherd rated it really liked it. The author of this book visited 5 factories around the world where some of his clothes had been made and talked to the workers at those factories. As someone who is concerned about the working conditions of the people making my clothes, I picked up this book expecting more of a guide on what companies to avoid buying clothes from, but it is not that kind of book.

I enjoyed "traveling" to Honduras, China, Bangladesh, Cambodia, and the United States and hearing the stories - Timmerman's writing st The author of this book visited 5 factories around the world where some of his clothes had been made and talked to the workers at those factories. I enjoyed "traveling" to Honduras, China, Bangladesh, Cambodia, and the United States and hearing the stories - Timmerman's writing style is funny and easy to read and it didn't take me long to finish the book.

The thing that interested me the most was that even though the factory workers are underpaid and have very long work hours, when asked what they thought about people who boycott their employers, they responded that it is still a job for them and helps them provide for their families.

Timmerman's point was that boycotting may be more harmful than helpful, which I thought to be interesting. However this point of view still does nothing to alleviate the fact that my money is going to support sweatshops, so I think some kind of middle ground would be best. Perhaps find fair trade companies to support so that the workers have good jobs at companies that treat them well.

Jun 18, Maya rated it really liked it. The author travels around the world trying to visit the factories where his favorite clothes were made Honduras, Cambodia, Bangladesh, China, India, and the US. This is not a feel terrible about yourself, the world sucks and it's so bad you're better off not thinking about it book. You will not want to slit your wrists when you finish.

This is good, because instead you will see that there are real things that can be done to improve garment workers lives and as the consumer, you can have a say The author travels around the world trying to visit the factories where his favorite clothes were made Honduras, Cambodia, Bangladesh, China, India, and the US. This is good, because instead you will see that there are real things that can be done to improve garment workers lives and as the consumer, you can have a say in getting them done. Timmerman's writing is an easy read, but a serious topic. He handles it seriously but realistically.

This book is for folks who truly care about doing the right thing but don't want to feel like they should slit their wrists because they happened to be born really lucky. For better or worse we are in a global economy and I appreciate knowing more about the working and living conditions of garment workers overseas.


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I appreciate having a more complete perspective when I make my decision about where to buy my clothes. I hope everyone is thinking about these issues. Jun 25, Jasmine rated it did not like it. This was a required reading for me. The author visited my school, and I was genuinely confused at how the man on stage and the man who had written the book were the same person. The writing was not fun to get through, I didn't relate to the casualness and I found it honestly pretty offensive. The author was supposed to be subjective but I still picked up glorification of good ol' American business and typical white savior self-gratification.

The facts were facts, and it was a good book for intro This was a required reading for me.

Where Am I Wearing?: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People That Make Our Clothes

The facts were facts, and it was a good book for introducing some globalist concepts, but just, I hated it. Jan 12, javadiva rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites. I really enjoyed the author's journeys, how personal he got with each laborer, giving them a voice. What I have taken away from this book is their pleas to not boycott companies who outsource labor, because this is the only income these poor laborers have. It helped me to not take for granted the privileged life I have here in the US. I know I will never have to make the choice to leave my children to live in a big city to make money so that my children can get an education.

I really feel everyo I really enjoyed the author's journeys, how personal he got with each laborer, giving them a voice. I really feel everyone should read this book. May 02, Bookstax rated it it was ok. I also almost felt like the author approached the whole project kind of casually. I expected more Feb 19, Laurie added it Shelves: nonfiction. Parts of this book were interesting, but Timmerman's lightweight "I'm just an ordinary guy wearing these boxer shorts" style is a little too lightweight for the topic; I think the book would have been better served by more planning and research to support his exploration of where his clothes come from.

Jan 12, Matt rated it it was ok. While I was excited about the concept and goal of this book I found it a little light in the content department. I understand it is a complex issue, but I was also looking for a little more resolution in the end other than being "an engaged consumer". I would still say it is worth reading, if just for the parts of one on one interaction with the garment workers. May 17, Amy rated it liked it. Easy enlightening read. Made me more grateful for where I am living and put a face on the people who made my clothes.

The author recounted his experiences of researching who made his clothes and then sort of made a quick conclusion at the end. I kind of wish there was a little more meat to the narrative or that it was a little more cohesive. But a good read overall. View 2 comments. Jul 31, Valerie rated it it was ok.

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I find the blog to book genre sloppy. Never as good as you hope. However, many very interesting points and A LOT of food for thought, with some geography and history thrown in for good measure. I work in the clothing industry Sep 04, Kaitlyn rated it liked it. It was a good concept and I learned a lot, but at times I felt almost as though he was rambling and I could have a hard time keeping track. Jun 24, Raych rated it it was ok Shelves: Doesn't give much information about the countries, factories and people that make our clothes.

Reads like a blog of a normal tourist who went to these places. Jan 20, Karen Walker rated it really liked it Shelves: globalization , world. Sep 07, Sarah Kr rated it it was ok. I had to read this in high school for a class and after several discussions all of the students agreed with opinions I have about the book: While I appreciate the author's effort to find out where and why we get our over priced clothing, I can't help but harbor resentment for the author himself. After all he has seen and experienced, he still seems woefully unable to display empathy or concern for those around him.

I specifically recall the blase way in which he abandoned his significant other to I had to read this in high school for a class and after several discussions all of the students agreed with opinions I have about the book: While I appreciate the author's effort to find out where and why we get our over priced clothing, I can't help but harbor resentment for the author himself. I specifically recall the blase way in which he abandoned his significant other to do these trips without really even mentioning how she might feel about it even if she was totally for it.

I also recall the time he decided to treat impoverished children to a day at the local amusement park and could not understand why they weren't having a blast and enjoying the pizza or whatever he got them.

Where Am I Wearing

He thought that these children who did not have good clothing and, in some cases, shoes wanted a single day at an amusement park rather than some basic necessities. His lack of humility or understanding of struggle really overshadows the the message that I think he wanted this book to convey. If you want to see where your clothing comes from I would point you in another direction.

He is currently traveling picking bananas and chocolate, catching lobster, and working on coffee plantations. A house on wheels provides tons of adventure. Start a Facing Project! Kelsey co-founded this community storytelling project. Now it's nationwide! Kelsey Timmerman Author, Speaker, Touron. Books Where Am I Giving? In , countries signed the Paris Agreement , pledging to combat climate change by taking action to curb the increase in global temperatures.

The Paris Agreement requires countries to report on their emissions and what steps they're taking to implement those plans. Now that the countries are coming together again for the U. Climate Action Summit in New York City, it's worth taking a look at what kind of progress they've made. The Climate Action Tracker keeps tabs on what each country is doing to limit warming, and if they're meeting their self-set goals. Countries are graded based on whether or not their actions would help limit warming to 1. Follow Us. For People Who Give a Damn.

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Where Am I Wearing?: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People That Make Our Clothes

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You are doing great. Keep it up : This website uses cookies in order to enhance your experience. We've all heard about the crowded, Dickensian "sweatshops" that produce our clothes, but few among us have actually been to We've all heard about the crowded, Dickensian "sweatshops" that produce our clothes, but few among us have actually been to one. Now he's filling us in on the workers who assembled his jeans-and his undies-as well as what he learned in the process. GOOD: When you first set out to visit these factories, how did you decide what countries to visit?

So I had a pair of loyal boxers, they were made in Bangladesh and, funnily enough, they are "Jingle These" Christmas boxers. That kind of struck me as ironic.

Where am I Wearing? by Kelsey Timmerman - Book - Read Online

I figure they don't celebrate Christmas in Bangladesh, yet they are making our underwear for Christmas. So, that's the first place I went, Bangladesh, to explore where my underwear came from. I was there for a month and then I went undercover as an underwear buyer, kind of by accident.

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I had a translator, and I'd tell him, "OK, just tell them I'm a writer, and I'm here, and I'm trying to track down where my underwear came from and who made my underwear. So he got me into a bunch of factories by doing that in Bangladesh. I also went to Cambodia where my Levis, the all-American blue jeans, were made. And then China where my Teva flip-flops were made. G: How much were you able to interact with the people working in the overseas factories? In Bangladesh the woman I met was a single mother.

Her husband left her, she was the mother of three kids. Her oldest son was eighteen, and she had sent him to Saudi Arabia to earn money to send back.


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As she was talking about her oldest son, you could kind of tell that she was worried that she might have to send her middle child, who was eleven, as well. So that is a rough reality. In Cambodia I befriended a whole roomful of girls. They lived eight in a room. The room was maybe eight feet by eight feet. And they didn't really have a bed. They had a wood table-a low lying, thick wood table. And I asked, "Man, this bed's big but it's not going to hold all eight of you. Where do you all sleep?